Types of People You’ll Meet at Interpreters & Translators Conferences and How to Network with Them

One of our favorite things about attending a conference is to meet fellow linguists. They come from all over the globe, speak many different languages, and have unique personalities. Their reasons for being at the conference vary as well.

Check out the list below of the different types of attendees you may encounter at a conference. Have you met/can you relate to any of them?

1) The Professional

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Nobody knows conferences better than the professional interpreter and translator. After all, they’ve been going to conferences for years. They may even be a part of a committee or two. A conference not only allows them to satisfy their continuing education requirements, but they’ll also be able to catch up with colleagues and friends and get updated on the industry.

How to: Talk about the industry innovations, or ask them about some tips for certification exams.

 

2) The Social Butterfly

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What better way to put your charisma on display than at a conference full of people? The social butterfly knows this better than anyone. They’re a networking machine with a gregarious personality that helps them make contacts, acquire leads, and close deals. Warm and friendly, the social butterfly makes great impression and is hard to forget. They are the ultimate schmoozer.

How to: Networking with them is easy. Just catch their glance, smile, and enjoy, as the social butterfly will initiate introductions and communication. Unless they are stopped on the way to you by admirers and multiple buddies.

 

3) The Learner

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Conferences are an information sponge’s dream, and rightfully so! With so many presentations on a wide range of topics, there is plenty to learn. You’ll be able to spot the learner quite easily. Running from session to session so as not to be late for one, the learner can be seen holding coffee in one hand and a smartphone, notebook, and pen in the other. The learner is a note-taking pro and is never afraid to ask questions.

How to: Ask them what they think about the workshop you both attended. You are likely learn something new from them!

 

4) The Networking Introvert 

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If it was up to them, they’d have stayed at home with their cat. But don’t let this mislead you. They knew fully well what they are getting into, and they would love to connect and chat with you, but are somewhat dreading to start. Especially, if they are new to the event or the industry. Everyone looks like they know each other; everything seems connected and buzzing with joy of recognition. The horror!

How to: Even if they seem disengaged, or occupied browsing their phone, don’t hesitate to approach them with a friendly introduction. A simple “Hi! My name is (_________), nice to meet you! Is this your first time at the (name of the conference)?” will do the trick. Introverts are often full of useful info and great professional expertise.

 

5) The Educator

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You can see them running a session or simply mingling with peers. They usually look very distinguished and confident, as this is most likely a hundredth conference they’ve been to, and they trained many of its attendees and speakers. At one of the previous ATA events we had an honor of dining with a veteran translator who had attended some of the first ATA conferences, and the chat was so interesting that it became the highlight of the conference for us. Whether they present at this conference or not, educators are a great source of knowledge and fun stories.

How to: Look sharp and ask many questions.

 

6) The Presenter

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A presenter might look confident, but no one is immune to stage fright, be they new or seasoned speakers. Especially at such major conferences as the annual ATA gig.

How to: Make the presenter’s day by telling them how interesting their speech was, and what you liked about it specifically.

 

7) The Exhibitor

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Sitting in a booth all day can get lonely. Not everyone knows that, but exhibitors are more than happy to greet anyone approaching their booth with a curious gaze and/or questions.

How to: Stop by even if you are only interested in a sugary pick-me-up or yet another stress ball. The goal is to have all the swag gone by the end of the conference anyway. The exhibitors are the only attendees here who have to work non-stop. Show them some love by asking about their job and exchanging business cards to connect on LinkedIn. Who knows, it might become some of your best connections at the conference.

 

8) The Businessperson

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When going to a conference, the goal of the businessperson is simple: to make money. This can be achieved a few ways. They can interact with people whom they can pitch and sell their product to. As a freelancer, they can pass along their resume or business cards. The businessperson can also use conferences as an opportunity to establish partnerships and relationships with other business people.

How to: Ask what they like most about their job. Business people love talking about their business.

 

9) The Intelligence Operative

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Conferences bring all types of language companies together under one roof. Whether they’re selling services, training programs, or software, it’s inevitable that representatives from these companies will be checking out their competition. These intelligence operatives will gather information, even posing as potential customers, by asking questions and collecting a rival’s marketing materials.

How to: Ask if they know of any job openings for a professional linguist.

 

This year Interpreter Education Online will be exhibiting at the main national event for translators and interpreters, American Translators Association (ATA) 58th Annual Conference. We look forward to connecting with over 1,800 translation and interpreting professionals from throughout the U.S. and around the world, and seeing our old friends. Find IEO booth #18 and ask us about the conference discount we offer on all our courses!
If you are missing the event this year, follow the workshops and get connected with participants by using #ata58 on Twitter.

What is happening to my brain?

I can remember how to say “Compass Rose” and “boatswain” in Spanish at the drop of a hat, but I cannot remember what I ate for lunch 2 days ago.

I can recall every word of a 2-minute narrative by a witness and render it fully into English, but I cannot recall what someone said to me (or what I said to someone) a week ago.

Because I am an interpreter!

Well, I am no neuroscientist or neuro-anything, but it doesn’t take much to realize my brain—and, by extension, my memory—does not work like most other people’s brains. Why? Because I am an interpreter. It’s that simple. I have been using my brain in ways that people who are not interpreters will never use theirs.

Scholarly articles on the bilingual brain are fascinating. In fact, they make me wonder how we can ever do what we do. One such researcher, Narly Golestani, from the Brain and Language Lab at the University of Geneva, has mapped the brain of interpreters during simultaneous renditions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRIs), confirming what most of us already know intuitively: “Simultaneous interpretation is an extremely demanding task that requires exquisite control of the language system in order to comprehend and produce speech concurrently in two different languages.”[1] This, of course, can be said of consecutive interpreting, although the concurrency of the process is somewhat different inasmuch as we must be perceiving or understanding the message in one language, retaining that information while converting it to another language, and within seconds be producing the converted message.

Beyond language

Golestani told Geoff Watts, a former biomedical researcher-now-journalist, during a visit he made to the Geneva lab: “There’s been a lot of work on bilingualism. Interpretation goes one step beyond that because the two languages are active simultaneously. And not just in one modality, because you have perception and production at the same time. So the brain regions involved go to an extremely high level, beyond language.”[2]

But why do I remember some things so well, and forget others so easily? Well, neurological research has found that we store information in two different parts of the brain. “It appears the hippocampus provides temporary storage for new information whereas other areas [of the brain] may handle long-term memory. Events that we are later able to remember appear to be channeled for more permanent storage in the cortex (the outer layers of the brain responsible for higher functions such as planning and problem-solving.)”[3] Could it be that I have nurtured my brain’s cortex more than my brain’s hippocampus, so I can store all that vocabulary and other linguistic data I need to perform my job as an interpreter?

Rapid and short-lived or slower and long lasting?

Susumu Tonegawa from the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics in Japan has conducted research that “points to the existence of complementary memory systems. One allows rapid memory formation but has limited capacity, and thus needs to pass information that should be retained to another system that is longer-lasting but slower-acting. This frees space in the hippocampus that can then be reused.”[4] And there you have it! My memory’s storage capacity is not unlimited.

“Psychological studies of human memory make a distinction between Short-Term Memory (STM) and Long-Term Memory (LTM). The idea of short-term memory simply means that you are retaining information for a short period of time without creating the neural mechanisms for later recall. Long-Term Memory occurs when you have created neural pathways for storing ideas and information which can then be recalled weeks, months, or even years later. To create these pathways, you must make a deliberate attempt to encode the information in the way you intend to recall it later. Long-term memory is a learning process. And it is essentially an important part of the interpreter’s acquisition of knowledge, because information stored in LTM may last for minutes to weeks, months, or even an entire life.”[5]

Because we are interpreters!

I always say that if I do not need to remember something in order to do a better job as an interpreter, I won’t. I really don’t need to clutter my brain’s cortex with useless memories, like what I had for lunch 2 days ago. Well, maybe it’s not that simple, but as an interpreter, I know for a fact I need a lot more language-processing information in my long-term memory than people who are not interpreters, so I will purposely let any trivial recollections fade away from the short-term memory in my hippocampus.

So if anything like this is happening to you, don’t worry. We are not absent-minded. We’re interpreters!


[1] Narly Golestani, Barbara Moser-Mercer, Alexis Hervais-Adelman, et al. Brain plasticity in interpreters. http://virtualinstitute.fti.unige.ch/home/index.php?module=clip&type=user&func=display&tid=4&pid=3&title=brain-plasticity-in-interpreters

[2] Geoff Watts. The amazing brains of the real-time interpreters. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20141117-the-ultimate-multi-taskers
[3] Simon Makin. Where does the brain store long-ago memories? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/where-does-the-brain-store-long-ago-memories/
[4] Ibid.
[5] Weihe Zhong. Memory Training in Interpreting. http://translationjournal.net/journal/25interpret.htm

 

By Janis Palma, federally certified English<>Spanish judiciary interpreter
This article first appeared on https://najit.org/

Online vs. Onsite interpreter education: Finding the right path for you

We see this question quite often. It’s not easy to find the right option, especially if you’re preparing for a complex certification exam and need to select the best possible training out there. As practicing interpreters, we know exactly how hard it is to allocate time for classroom training, which requires commute. As Michiganders, we also know how tricky getting to class can be during snowstorm season or heavy rains.

But apart from these obvious perks of online education (and ‘e-learning’ being a trendy buzzword), there’s a more scientific proof of online training benefits, too.

According to the 93-page research report from the U.S. Department of Education, students in online training perform better than those receiving onsite instructions. For 12 years researchers studied online and classroom performance for the same continuing education courses, for topics ranging from healthcare to the military. On average, online students would rank in the 59th percentile in tested performance, with classroom students scoring in the 50th percentile. That’s a significant difference for a court or medical interpreter certification test.

Barbara Means, an educational psychologist and the lead author of the report, said that the study’s major significance lies in demonstrating that “online learning today is not just better than nothing — it actually tends to be better than conventional instruction.”

Since 2009-2010, when this research was published, online education has developed dramatically, offering even more material, interactive features, collaboration tools and value.

Let’s analyze the pros and cons of each arrangement to see which option suits you best:

Economy

With classroom interpreter training costing a steep average of $10,000, online courses provide a significant relief to your budget, varying in cost from $169 for a single-topic course to $2,200 for the most comprehensive and extensive training programs. E-Learning also eliminates the cost of travel.

Transparency

It’s always useful to preview courses before paying. We offer virtual tours during which our Course Administrator demonstrates the courses’ content and answers any questions.

Flexibility

When you have a full-time job and a family to take care of, there will inevitably be times when you have to skip a class. Studying online, you can complete courses at your own pace, whenever and wherever it’s convenient.

IEO courses are easily accessible from iPads and iPhones, allowing you to study anywhere, for example, during breaks between your court assignments. With an average CE single-topic course requiring approximately 6 or 8 hours of your time over the course of 2 weeks, it’s perfectly possible to fit your studies into even the tightest schedules. With so many choices for continuing education, interpreters don’t have to put their assignments on hold to stay current in their field.

Personalized approach

According to experts, online education provides learning experiences that are more tailored to individual students than is possible in classrooms. If a student has mastered some of the content already, they can skip over that part instead of getting bored in the classroom. Furthermore, with a teacher available through Skype, email and other platforms, students can ask questions and receive individual help any time they need it.

Accessibility

While students have more chances for face-to-face discussion with an instructor onsite, e-Learning students can access the materials when it suits them, which creates a more positive engagement.

Practice

In traditional classes, students must often wait to practice their skills until they complete the homework. The interactive nature of online learning allows students to apply their new knowledge immediately to complete tasks.

Focus

In a classroom setting, you always run the risk of falling into a passive learning slump, where you simply accept all of the information coming your way without seriously engaging. That said, with the right teacher and fellow students, the dialogue that exists in a classroom setting can help you stay engaged and retain more knowledge.

On the other hand, online courses require their own set of skills for maintaining focus, like finding a way to detach from your daily routine and really concentrate on your studies.

Community

Onsite wins this one, with some people choosing classroom learning for the chance to network with their peers and develop soft skills unrelated to the curriculum.

Although online education doesn’t offer you the sense of community or multi-sensory experience you get in a classroom setting, IEO invites you to socialize with colleagues and trainers by joining the conversation on our Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter pages. You can also participate in our Twitter Terminology contest for a chance to win a discounted course or a free webinar.

Discipline

For most people, discipline is the main factor when deciding between classroom and online learning. Just like how the trendy work practice of telecommuting is not for everyone, online education requires a stronger will, goal-orientation, and ability to focus.

We hope this information will make it easier for you to make the right decision according to your personal goals and preferences, and we wish you best of luck on your career path. If you still have any questions, we would be more than happy to answer them!

 

Elena Kirillova,

Special for Interpreter Education Online

Medical Spring and Legal Summer

Are you happy that winter is almost over and spring is around the corner? If you are organizing a list of things to do, like spring cleaning or working out to get the beach body, do not forget to add getting your CEUs to the list. And we have something to help you: this year IEO offers medical spring and legal summer of webinars. You can choose either of the packages for a discounted price of $65 or sign up for both! To learn more about our webinars, click here.

Medical Spring (expired)

March 7: Choosing the Right Path: Advanced Ethical Decision-Making for Interpreters by Manuel Higgenbotham

April 4: Five National Language Service Quality Measures by Izabel Souza

May 9: The Interpreter’s Elusive Quest to Maintain Register by Natalya Mytareva

Legal Summer (expired)

June 6: Vocabulary-Building Resources and Techniques for Court Interpreters by Ernest Niño-Murcia

July 11: An International Perspective – Family Law Terminology for Translators by Suzanne Deliscar

August 22: Immigration 101: An Interpreter’s Perspective by Francesca Samuel

To purchase separately, or learn about CEUs offered, click here. 

Top 7 Interpreter Education Online Blogs of 2016

Dear fellow Interpreters,

Thank you for your feedback, and constant support. In 2016, you were most interested in video remote interpreting, certificates for continuing education and certification, vicarious trauma, finding your niche, and webinars. Here is the list of the blogs that you considered most useful in 2016 (click on the title to read the article):

1. Rejuvenate Your Career!

It is an all too common feeling – you’ve worked hard to get where you are in your career and then, suddenly, it starts to feel a bit routine. So how do you revive both your career and your enthusiasm? There are many easy ways to accomplish a sense of job rejuvenation.

2. Do You Have a Niche?

In any profession, there is typically extensive training and a process for learning information and applying it. But what happens once you have completed the training and are a working professional with experience? Continuing education is something we have talked about before and will always rally for, but is there something else you could be doing to improve your client base and expand your market appeal?

3. The New Health Epidemic

You won’t hear about this on the news. You aren’t likely to encounter it on social media either. The epidemic sweeping the nation isn’t a new virus, or a rare re-surfacing of an old one. It is, quite simply, stress. That’s right, The World Health Organization has deemed stress the “health epidemic of the 21st century.” While work-life balance has always been a struggle, it has become increasingly necessary and yet nearly impossible to accomplish.

4. The Value of Webinars

It’s no secret that webinars have been a growing trend in every industry for a while now. Attending a live seminar or conference is obviously beneficial, as is taking an online training course. But a webinar speaks to the heart of our fast-paced and steadily increasing business world’s main need: “get it done now, and move on to the next task.”

5. Certificate vs. Certification for Interpreters: What’s the Difference? part 1

Being bilingual does not automatically indicate or equal the ability to interpret. Just as the needed skill sets for interpreting as compared to translating are remarkably different, a similar case can be made for bilingualism not being a sufficient guarantee of competency for one to work as an interpreter. This is particularly true for Heritage speakers.

6. Interpreting in Immigration Settings: Be prepared, don’t be swayed

When working on an immigration case, the last thing attorneys want to worry about is an interpreter who is not competent or professional. We asked an immigration attorney Leonid Garbuzov for his input on what makes a great immigration interpreter.

7. Q&A with Eliana Lobo on VRI interpreting

Q: What are some of the difficulties commonly faced by remote interpreters?

A: Challenges for the interpreter include managing the flow, enforcing the use of the pre-session (providers may already be mid-task or mid-conversation when the video connection brings up the image). Often, this leads to their wanting to have the interpreter jump in mid-sentence. The challenge is finding a way to enforce the use of the pre-session and have it be viewed as part of your customer service rather than insisting on having things proceed according to the interpreter’s wishes. Confirming language preference, confidentiality and the patient and provider name are all steps that are part of the pre-session, which leads to greater patient satisfaction. Finding your voice and having professional scripts to use in your delivery helps.

We love to hear from you! Help us provide you with more useful and relevant info in 2017, or simply share your experience: Services@InterpreterEducationOnline.com

Happy New Year! 

Q&A with Eliana Lobo on VRI interpreting

Q: What are some of the difficulties commonly faced by remote interpreters?Eliana Lobo Headshot

A: Challenges for the interpreter include managing the flow, enforcing the use of the pre-session (providers may already be mid-task or mid-conversation when the video connection brings up the image). Often, this leads to their wanting to have the interpreter jump in mid-sentence. The challenge is finding a way to enforce the use of the pre-session and have it be viewed as part of your customer service rather than insisting on having things proceed according to the interpreter’s wishes. Confirming language preference, confidentiality and the patient and provider name are all steps that are part of the Pre-Session, which leads to greater patient satisfaction. Finding your voice and having professional scripts to use it in your delivery helps.

Q: What are the differences between remote video interpreting for healthcare and remote video conference interpreting?

A: For healthcare, interpreting is meant to facilitate understanding and trust between parties. In a conference situation, accuracy and speed are the prized elements. Also, you will have a partner in the booth with you for conference interpreting, but not when you interpret in a hospital or clinic. Again, being able to manage the flow to insure accuracy and understanding are key elements for the healthcare interpreter.

Q:  How long does an average interpreting call last?

A: There is no average length of call, just like there is no average patient. Call can last as little as a couple of minute, because the onsite interpreter arrives and takes over, and they can last for several hours, depending on the nature of the encounter.

Q: How will VRI impact the profession in the coming years?

A: VRI is the fastest growing market segment for healthcare interpreting. Other sub-specialties in the interpreting world are also using VRI in growing numbers (court, social services, schools and conference centers). For interpreters working onsite, their work will become more challenging as the simpler requests will increasingly be shunted to the phone or video, leaving the difficult and challenging assignments to fill an increasingly larger proportion of the onsite interpreter’s daily schedule.

Q: Interpreting is interpreting, so why would it be important for a medical or legal interpreter to take a course on VRI or attend a webinar on the same topic?

A: The short answer is to improve one’s knowledge and therefore, competence. The longer answer lies in whether you consider yourself to be a professional interpreter or not. All professions require certification and continuing education. Doctors, nurses, teachers and lawyers, are all required to get certified and maintain their certifications by pursuing continuing education and working the minimum hours per year to keep their skill set and certifications in good order. Are you certified, or qualified nationally as a healthcare interpreter? Are you certified, or registered by your state’s Administrative Office of the Courts as a court interpreter? If so, you should be pursuing continuing education to maintain your credentials.

Did you know the video remote interpreting is the fastest growing segment within language services? Do you want to stay viable and well trained in best practice for the new employment opportunities? Then getting trained in new technologies is a great way to achieve your goals.

Click here to register for the webinar on What you Need to Succeed as a Remote Interpreter, presented by Eliana 

Interpreting in Immigration Settings: Be prepared, don’t be swayed

When working on an immigration case, the last thing attorneys want to worry about is an interpreter who is not competent or professional. We asked an immigration attorney Leonid Garbuzov for his input on what makes a great immigration interpreter. Below are some of his suggestions about what attorneys and judges expect from the interpreter.passport-315266_1280

  1. Be Prepared

Nothing is worse than an interpreter that comes unprepared. Always bring a pen, paper and a legal dictionary.  Brush up on your legal terminology.  Don’t be late and don’t schedule other assignments for the same morning or afternoon as your immigration hearing, as you never know how long you will be there.

      2. Learn Your Terminology but Don’t Be a Know-It-All

While you should not expect the attorney, immigration officer, or the judge to explain legal terminology, you have to be sure that you understand the subject matter.  One illustrative example from my experience was an interpreter who mistranslated a question about an immigrant’s potential ties with “guerrilla organizations”, and asked whether he ever belonged to a “gorilla organization”.  When in doubt, it is better to ask.  If you realize that a mistake has occurred, you have to notify the judge, hearing officer, or the attorney immediately, and explain and correct the mistake.

      3. Do Not Add or Take Away From What’s Being Said

Another mistake is when an interpreter tries to add personal comments in order to make the subject matter easier to understand.  While the hearing officer, the client, or the attorney may not always be clear, it is not the interpreter’s job to “second-guess” and help them.  In one instance, when a client of mine with a serious mental impairment could not respond to an immigration officer’s questions, the interpreter tried to tell him that he was answering incorrectly, and even attempted to suggest what the correct answer should be.  Such conduct by an interpreter is never appropriate.

       4. Be Confident

Finally, it is important to not get riled up and to keep a professional demeanor.  This is especially important when an attorney—particularly the one who speaks the same language as the client – decides to challenge the accuracy of your translation.  It is important to know that these challenges are not uncommon and that they do not necessarily mean that an interpreter made a mistake or a misstatement.  An interpreter must remain undeterred by these tactics, must keep his/her voice clear, and must continue to interpret to the best of his/her ability without being swayed by these challenges.    

By Leonid Garbuzov of Garbuzov Law Firm, PLLC, special for IEO

IEO offers a comprehensive course developed by professional immigration interpreters and immigration attorneys. Immigration interpreting presents unique sets of challenges and requirements, so it’s essential for any interpreter to learn the protocol and legal concepts to understand and succeed in this field.    

Deaf Awareness Week

love-683926_1920Today, we celebrate the start of International Week of the Deaf 2016. An initiative that launched in 1958 in Rome, Italy by the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD). Since then it has been celebrated annually by the Deaf community all over the globe.

Last week of September of each year sees a highly concerted move towards global advocacy and awareness. WFD aims to spread its message as widely as possible to ensure that its campaign is noticed through media coverage.

In honor of the Deaf Awareness Week, Interpreter Education Online (IEO), leading healthcare and legal interpreter training organization, is offering a special discount for ASL Interpreters. In partnership with CEUs on the GO, IEO offers courses that offer RID CEUs. And from now through September 25, 2016, ASL Interpreters will receive 20% off any course taken through IEO.

Contact us for a coupon!

Terminology Contest: Who’s the most proficient of them all?

Every day we post a medical or legal term of the day for our interpreters. If you have Twitter, follow us and join for the contest: respond to our Term of The Day with your translation into your target language. ASL interpreters can record and post videos with interpretation of the term.

Those who will tweet the most number of term translations or ASL interpretations in the end of each month have a chance to win 30% discount to any one of our single-topic courses or free access to any of our webinars!

Certificate vs. Certification for Interpreters, part 2

All 50 states have well established prerequisites, testing and certification processes for their court interpreters. To find out the requirements for your state, look for the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) site for your state. If you Google “AOC interpreter certification” and the name of your state, you will be directed to the site for additional information and the testing dates that are relevant for your area.

Unlike court interpreting in the U.S., where all 50 states have a process overseen by their respective AOCs, medical interpreting has only had state certification since 1991 for one state. The State of Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) certified medical and social service interpreters. National healthcare interpreter certification is only available for specific languages, and has only been available since 2010. Oregon has skipped implementing a state process and requires national certification for healthcare interpreters working in state hospitals. This is a growing trend in many states.

For more information regarding Washington’s state certifications for medical and social services interpreting, visit:   https://www.dshs.wa.gov/fsa/language-testing-and-certification-program

DSHS-WA currently certifies medical interpreters in the following eight languages:

  • Cambodian
  • Chinese Cantonese
  • Chinese Mandarin
  • Korean
  • Laotian
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Vietnamese

DSHS currently certifies social service interpreters, medical interpreters, translators, DSHS active and potential bilingual employees and licensed agency personnel in the above languages.

For all other languages, The Department authorizes social service interpreters and medical interpreters using a screening test.  All other languages are screened and authorized by DSHS, but only the eight languages listed above are certified languages for medical interpreters in the State of Washington.

The national certifying bodies also certify only in specific, high demand languages. Beginning in 2010, two national certifying bodies, Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) and the National Certification Board for Medical interpreters (NCBMI) began certifying interpreters whose second language is Spanish.

Each year since then has resulted in the introduction of an additional language certification test. Currently, CCHI has certified approximately 1,800 healthcare interpreters nationally as CHIs, and NBCMI has certified approximately 1,300 medical interpreters nationwide.

Combined, both of these national certifying bodies, CCHI and NBCMI, offer healthcare interpreter certification for seven languages: Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese and Korean. Pre-requisites to register for the written and oral proficiency tests include a high school diploma and a minimum of 40 hours of medical interpreter training.

For the Deaf community, the certifying body that assesses and certifies ASL interpreters is known as Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID). Although there is currently no medical sub-specialty training for ASL interpreters, they do offer specialized training in interpreting for mental health. However, contrast their number of certified interpreters with the spoken language certifications and you will be impressed.

Currently in the U.S. there are more than 16,000 RID certified ASL interpreters! The prerequisites for obtaining and maintaining certification are stricter for ASL interpreters than for spoken language interpreters. Among the stricter prerequisites for ASL are a college degree plus six units of CEUs every year to keep ASL certifications current.

(source:  http://www.rid.org/continuing-education/certification-maintenance )

If you are an interpreter, I urge you to pursue national certification. If you supervise a program or own an interpreter agency, I strongly urge you to encourage your staff and agency interpreters who work for you to pursue national certification.

Eliana Lobo, 

Special for IEO