Top 7 Interpreter Education Online Blogs of 2016

Dear fellow Interpreters,

Thank you for your feedback, and constant support. In 2016, you were most interested in video remote interpreting, certificates for continuing education and certification, vicarious trauma, finding your niche, and webinars. Here is the list of the blogs that you considered most useful in 2016 (click on the title to read the article):

1. Rejuvenate Your Career!

It is an all too common feeling – you’ve worked hard to get where you are in your career and then, suddenly, it starts to feel a bit routine. So how do you revive both your career and your enthusiasm? There are many easy ways to accomplish a sense of job rejuvenation.

2. Do You Have a Niche?

In any profession, there is typically extensive training and a process for learning information and applying it. But what happens once you have completed the training and are a working professional with experience? Continuing education is something we have talked about before and will always rally for, but is there something else you could be doing to improve your client base and expand your market appeal?

3. The New Health Epidemic

You won’t hear about this on the news. You aren’t likely to encounter it on social media either. The epidemic sweeping the nation isn’t a new virus, or a rare re-surfacing of an old one. It is, quite simply, stress. That’s right, The World Health Organization has deemed stress the “health epidemic of the 21st century.” While work-life balance has always been a struggle, it has become increasingly necessary and yet nearly impossible to accomplish.

4. The Value of Webinars

It’s no secret that webinars have been a growing trend in every industry for a while now. Attending a live seminar or conference is obviously beneficial, as is taking an online training course. But a webinar speaks to the heart of our fast-paced and steadily increasing business world’s main need: “get it done now, and move on to the next task.”

5. Certificate vs. Certification for Interpreters: What’s the Difference? part 1

Being bilingual does not automatically indicate or equal the ability to interpret. Just as the needed skill sets for interpreting as compared to translating are remarkably different, a similar case can be made for bilingualism not being a sufficient guarantee of competency for one to work as an interpreter. This is particularly true for Heritage speakers.

6. Interpreting in Immigration Settings: Be prepared, don’t be swayed

When working on an immigration case, the last thing attorneys want to worry about is an interpreter who is not competent or professional. We asked an immigration attorney Leonid Garbuzov for his input on what makes a great immigration interpreter.

7. Q&A with Eliana Lobo on VRI interpreting

Q: What are some of the difficulties commonly faced by remote interpreters?

A: Challenges for the interpreter include managing the flow, enforcing the use of the pre-session (providers may already be mid-task or mid-conversation when the video connection brings up the image). Often, this leads to their wanting to have the interpreter jump in mid-sentence. The challenge is finding a way to enforce the use of the pre-session and have it be viewed as part of your customer service rather than insisting on having things proceed according to the interpreter’s wishes. Confirming language preference, confidentiality and the patient and provider name are all steps that are part of the pre-session, which leads to greater patient satisfaction. Finding your voice and having professional scripts to use in your delivery helps.

We love to hear from you! Help us provide you with more useful and relevant info in 2017, or simply share your experience: Services@InterpreterEducationOnline.com

Happy New Year! 

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